Thursday, November 29, 2012

Quashing controversy

Found online: Instead of publicly throwing his support behind Smith and squashing any controversy after the Bears game -- something he had done at every opening since being hired before the 2011 season — he fanned the flames by saying he likely would go with the hot hand.


I think I wrote about squash and quash not long ago. You don't squash controversy; you quash it.

You squash melons; ask Gallagher.

Here's an edit of that sentence:

Instead of publicly supporting Smith and quashing any controversy after the Bears game — something he had done consistently since being hired before the 2011 — he fanned the flames by saying he likely would go with the hot hand.



Contact: I can be reached at tgilli52@gmail.com or nc3022@yahoo.com. Also, my Twitter handle is EDITORatWORK.

(a book of great stories about the Intimidator)
(the book of great NASCAR stories)

More blog entries by Tom Gillispie

Anecdotes by Tom Gillispie

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Slogging through the Internet

I see little problems with grammar when I read online, and they bother me.

I just noticed a man having trouble with past and passed. If something has happened, it's in the past. I passed a food stand, turned around and bought something. I passed a football. I passed gallstones (bummer).

I used to write "alright," but I later learned that "all right" is correct. I still see "alright" all the time, and it's not "all right" with me.

A man recently wrote, "I watched in horror as a boy witness his father die of AIDS." The boy witnessed his father's death.

A writer often will talk about a six hour flight. It's a six-hour flight. Help the reader.

One writer used being "empathical" and "confrontating" in the same sentence. Perhaps she meant empathic and confrontational, although those words seem odd together.

Another wrote, "Its a special day for me." Yes, but it's a special day. It is.

Instead of "greetings," a man wrote "greattings." Great things?

One man said that someone was "very complementary." Apparently he was a big help, but "complimentary" would have worked.

I just found "I am stuck in my writing, how do I brake out of this" on a network for writers. All together now: How to break out of this. I brake for bad writers.

I encountered the word "corporates" and wondered if he meant incorporated or corporations. Spell check didn't know it. It turns out that the first definition of corporate is "formed into a corporation." You learn something everyday.

FOREIGN OUTLOOK: I've encountered people from foreign countries who teach English as a second language, and these "teachers" are almost functionally illiterate in English. Still, I'm often amazed at how well people from Switzerland, Romania, Spain and the Ivory Coast (or other foreign countries) write in English. Sadly, they write better than many Americans.


CONTACT: Email me at tgilli52@gmail.com or nc3022@yahoo.com. Also, my Twitter handle is EDITORatWORK.

(a book of great stories about the Intimidator)
(the book of great NASCAR stories)

More blog entries by Tom Gillispie

Anecdotes by Tom Gillispie