Tuesday, December 30, 2014

"Wrong" verb in headline catches my attention

BUSTED HEADLINE FOUND ONLINE: Detroit newspaper use wrong Harbaugh on front page

The story is about a Detroit newspaper using a photo of Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh rather than former San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh, who is becoming the football coach at the University of Michigan.

But the headline itself caught my eye. They said newspaper use. In the U.S., that would be Detroit newspaper USES...

Obviously, this is a British web site; the British would use a singular verb for a collective noun like newspaper, police, government, hospital, etc.

It looks strange to see a British-style headline on a story about a U.S. newspaper messing up.


EDITORIAL GROUP: If you're a writer, editor or general freelancer, you might check out my Freelance Writers and Editors group on Yahoo! We've been really active lately, and I think we've become useful to each other.

WRITERS' GUIDELINES: If you want to write for magazines (or book publishers), check out the writers' guidelines on my Freelance Writers and Editors group on Yahoo!

CHECK IT OUT: You might look at Funds for Writers, which specializes in grants for writers.

CONTACT:
You can reach me at tgilli52@gmail.com or nc3022@yahoo.comAlso, my Twitter handle is EDITORatWORK.

Entries from The Dog Blog
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(a book of great stories about the Intimidator)
(the book of great NASCAR stories)

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Anecdotes by Tom Gillispie

Sunday, December 28, 2014

Rules and regulations; what's the diff?

We've all seen official signs that say "Rules and Regulations," and I've often wondered the difference between the two ... if there is any.

I found a web site that tried to explain the difference between the two, but I came away unconvinced. The web site used Dictionary.com to explain in this way:

Dictionary.com defines ‘rule’ as:

  • A principle or regulation governing conduct, action, procedure, arrangement
  • The customary or normal circumstance, occurrence, manner, practice, quality, etc.
  • To control or direct; exercise dominating power, authority, or influence over; govern.
  • To decide or declare judicially or authoritatively
  • To make a formal decision or ruling, as on a point at law.

Dictionary.com defines ‘regulation’ as:

  • A law, rule, or other order prescribed by authority, especially to regulate conduct.
  • The act of regulating or the state of being regulated.
  • A governmental or ministerial order having the force of law
  • As required by official rules or procedure


I don't know; I see "regulation" under the definition of "rule," and I see "rule" under the definition of "regulation."

I ask again; what's the difference?

Links: On my web siteI have links to some of my stories online.

Editorial group: If you're a writer, editor or general freelancer, you might check out my Freelance Writers and Editors group on Yahoo! We've been really active lately, and I think we've become useful to each other.

Writers' guidelines: If you want to write for magazines (or book publishers), check out the writers' guidelines on my Freelance Writers and Editors group on Yahoo!

Followers: Welcome to all the followers on this blog. May the Force be with you.

Check it out: You might look at Funds for Writers, which specializes in grants for writers.



Contact:
 You can reach me at tgilli52@gmail.com or nc3022@yahoo.comAlso, my Twitter handle is EDITORatWORK.

Entries from The Dog Blog
Blog entries from The Auto Racing Journal

(a book of great stories about the Intimidator)
(the book of great NASCAR stories)

More blog entries by Tom Gillispie

Anecdotes by Tom Gillispie